What Happens after the Storm Settles?

What Happens after the Storm Settles?

Connor Harding, Editor-in-Chief

June 1st to November 30th is labeled as “hurricane season” in the United States. As the name suggests, this is the time of year in which highly destructive storms are more common and prevalent than any other period during the year. This season usually brings with it one or two highly destructive storms that have the ability to level whole neighborhoods or flood whole communities. This year brought with it the fury of Hurricane Matthew, a violent storm that reached category four status and a devastating top wind speed of over 140 mph, according to the news and online sources. Matthew carved a path of incomprehensible destruction through the Atlantic, hitting areas such as Haiti, Florida, Georgia, South Carolina, and North Carolina. Thankfully for fearful residents, the storm eventually dissipated in the middle of its rampage and ceased to damage any further property or injure anyone else. However, the end of the storm leaves state officials and citizens to face the daunting task of rebuilding all that was lost to the winds and water.

 
What exactly happens when the rain settles down after a hurricane like Matthew? When all was said and done, over 1,300 deaths can be linked directly to the storm, leaving dozens of thousands of families to mourn the deaths of their loved ones. In North Carolina alone, 100,000 homes have been destroyed, leaving hundreds of thousands of people without a place to return to.  As HHS students, it is important that we increase our knowledge of national and global affairs, so that we become better informed adult citizens in the future.

 
With the above idea in mind, this reporter asked Hubbard students how much money they thought it costs to repair damages from a severe hurricane.  There were many answers in various amounts, ranging from 500 million to 10 billion dollars. These totals already seemed drastic enough, but the actual total was far greater than that. According to sources, there is a projected total of 25,000,000,000 dollars worth of damages caused by Matthew in the few short days that it hovered along the east coast. In more minor damages, there were 2,500,000 people who lost power for weeks on end, giving electric companies a true nightmare to handle when they attempt to restore service. Now the only question to be asked is: How can the southeast cope with all this damage?

 
Thousands of search and rescue missions have been deployed by the Coast Guard and National Guard, along with hundreds of brave locals. There were over 1,500 people rescued from the rooftops of flooded homes in North Carolina, and many more were saved elsewhere. Millions of dollars are being poured into relief funds that are being used to buy newly homeless residents water, food, and other necessities while their precarious situation is being handled.  Organizations such as UNICEF and the MIAMI FOUNDATION are collecting blankets, sleeping bags, and other essentials for people in Haiti and Florida who are now living outside of their homes. Cleanup efforts for many communities are now in full swing, and hopefully within the next few months, we will see real progress in re-developing the people’s lives from the ground up. So what does happen when the rain settles down after a hurricane like Matthew? Well, the nation stands behind those affected and helps to put everything back together, piece by piece.

Source: http://www.cnn.com/2016/10/04/americas/hurricane-matthew/index.