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The Death Penalty: Should It Survive?

Allie Perry, Global News Editor

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      Put 50 strangers in a room, ask them their opinions on capital punishment, and most probably the room will be quickly divided into two camps: those who favor the death penalty, and those who are against it.  Those in favor of the law cite it as a deterrent and a limited taxpayer expense, while claiming just retribution.  Those who are against it claim the need for humane treatment, and cite the possibility of both wrongful death and rehabilitation.  However you see it, the argument continues.

      Death penalty laws have been in effect in the United States for over 400 years, dating back to Captain George Kendall of the 13 colonies, according to online sources. The death penalty was once used not just in extreme cases, but for any offense that could be considered treasonous to the British crown or sacrilegious. Hangings were often a public spectacle used to display and humiliate the accused, and many times there would be no official trial beforehand, only a hanging rope tied to the top of a wooden platform. There were other, more unusual methods of eliminating criminals. Britain is known for its long and brutal history of methods, most commonly beheading, hanging, and boiling to death.

      It seems that the death penalty has been utilized in almost every culture since the beginning of time, and since its first implementation, people have argued for and against both sides of the issue. The original methods of capital punishment have changed immensely in America since the 1600’s. In the 1960’s, the death penalty methods were revised to those with which we are familiar today. From the electric chair to lethal injection, this imposed act has always been considered the most severe punishment a criminal could receive, but many argue that premise to be false. Many would say that the death penalty is too good for some, an easy way out. So the question of continuance in the United States falls on the opinions of the people.

      Students here at Hubbard High School have their own opinions on capital punishment as well.  When asked if the death penalty should be outlawed in the United States, senior Taylor Begeot said, “I think the death penalty should continue in the United States. We have so many criminals that kill without remorse, so why should they be allowed to live their lives with no regret?”  Another student, senior Chelsea Chaibi stated, “I think the death penalty should be outlawed. No matter what someone has done, they should be forced to live with that guilt for the rest of their lives.” Of course, this second senior assumes that all criminals feel guilt. However, many scientists and researchers argue that socio and psychopaths do not.  

      The death penalty debate continues to this day and will continue for years to come. There is no right or wrong side, but one thing is very clear: crime without some form of punishment–external or internal–is a historic impossibility and a future improbability.

 

Source: https://deathpenaltyinfo.org/part-i-history-death-penalty\

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About the Writer
Allie Perry, Global News Editor
  • Allie Perry is a senior staff member and Global News Editor of the HUB. Allie has been a HUB staff member for two years now, and she enjoys writing stories that pique the interest of her readers.  She is an only child, but that has not stopped her from being the outgoing and people person she is today. These characteristics are exactly what makes Allie a great HUB member. She loves to write and loves to inform her fellow classmates on current, and sometimes controversial, world events.
  • Allie is a CCP student and takes all her class on the YSU campus. On top of taking these rigorous courses, Allie still manages to stay connected to her school. She is involved in Mock Trial, Rotary Interact, NHS, and gives time to other volunteer groups. Allie also competes in powerlifting competitions all over the country and holds over 20 state records.
  • After graduation, Allie hopes to attend The Ohio State University and get her undergraduate degree in pre-law. After that, she hopes to attend law school and become a ADA for the state. Writing has always influenced Allie’s life and will continue to do so throughout her college career and beyond.
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The Death Penalty: Should It Survive?