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Five Dangerous Teen Trends

Giavanna Hosack, Junior Staff Writer

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The internet is one of the best inventions in history, and it’s used by trillions of people each day.  The mass popularity is great, but this makes this medium an easily accessible influence on the younger generation–in both good and bad ways. Today, the discussion centers on the negative influence when it comes to teen trends.

Do your parents know what you’ve been eating may be more than just mom’s homemade mac-and-cheese? The dangerous teen trend of consuming Tide pods started out as a joke, but quickly went viral via the internet. Teens have been posting selfie videos and pictures on social media of themselves and their friends ingesting the pods instead of using them to wash their clothes. Senior Skylar Sakonyi explains to us that, “The idea of eating Tide pods is irresponsible. The chemicals included in the detergent are meant for cleaning clothes and could hurt you horribly. Anyone participating has no idea of their own health and safety.” According to the Washington Post online, there were over “12,000 Poison Control calls for people eating Tide pods last year.  Additionally, online sources report that YouTube will no longer post videos of foolish teens engaging in this dangerous trend:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oGCV2RHUiTA

Are you jumping out of your car to sing and dance to a catchy toon? The In My Feelings challenge started by Shiggy turned into a dangerous hazard in which teens are participating. “Dancing in a Reebok tracksuit outfit, Shiggy is filmed dancing happily in the middle of the road to the song”  Junior Allison Phibbs tells us that, “The In My Feelings Challenge is dangerous because people get out of a moving vehicle to dance. The driver is distracted and the person dancing isn’t looking where they are going. The driver is usually filming, causing a potential risk for the passengers and the other vehicles.”  Best to stay in your car and watch the road, no?

https://www.thesun.co.uk/fabulous/6890550/kiki-challenge-shiggy-trend-drake-in-my-feelings-lyrics/

Have you or your friends ever eaten a spoon full of ground cinnamon without any water? The Daily Mail online  informs us that, “The fad involves daring someone to swallow a spoonful of ground cinnamon in 60 seconds without water, but the spice is caustic, trying to gulp it down can cause choking, throat irritation, breathing trouble, and even collapsed lungs.”  Yes, some have heard that cinnamon is good for one’s help and can prevent diabetes; however, that needs to be taken in capsule form

https://www.dailymail.co.uk/health/article-2321972/Could-Cinnamon-Craze-LIVER-damage.html

Even if a teen hasn’t heard about the cinnamon challenge, he or he is sure to have heard about the juul fad. Juuls have becme popular within the under-aged teen community. They are a way that teens can smoke covertly, even in classes, without a teacher’s awareness.  Still, the danger is in the consumed nicotine. As the company states, “The Juul wasn’t designed to be healthy, but rather it was designed to be less unhealthy than cigarettes.” It is very unhealthy to the teen community and highly addictive.

https://todaysfive.com/2018/04/25/is-smoking-a-juul-better-than-cigarettes/

Have you ever heard of a challenge that gave you third degree burns? The salt and ice challenge, according to aol.com, “Causes painful open sores to form on your skin.”  In this crazy trend, “Kids pour salt on a part of their body and then place an ice cube over it. That salt lowers the temperature of the ice-cube and within five to ten minutes, the cube can cause serious injuries. ‘It’s essentially like frostbite,’said Dr. Brian Wagers, a pediatric physician at Riley Hospital for Children at IU Health.” Freshmen Brooke Myers exposes that, “Personality,I have never done the challenge and never will, because I know that it can seriously hurt somehow and it’s ridiculous.” Many students, but not all, agree with Brooke, as her statement is completely true.  It is unnecessary for someone to harm him/herself over a challenge that can leave permanent scars.

https://www.aol.com/article/news/2017/02/02/doctors-warn-parents-about-dangerous-salt-and-ice-challenge/21705975/

Fads and trends like these are commonly seen in the high school community.  Surely there are safer, better ways for teens to find entertainment? All of these trends are very dangerous and could result in serious health problems or even death, and the goal, after all, to traveling through adolescence is to be able to live into adulthood and become productive adults.  Tide Pods and Juuling certainly won’t help any teen get there.

Source: https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/wonk/wp/2018/01/16/there-were-over-10000-poison-control-calls-for-people-eating-laundry-pods-last-year/?utm_term=.676f75524391

 

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About the Writer
Giavanna Hosack, Junior Staff Writer


Returning for her junior year at Hubbard High School, Giavanna Hosack is a second-year HUB staff member. She wants to continue writing in her senior...

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Five Dangerous Teen Trends